Museu da Moda, Jóias e Acessórios

Hair ornament in the form of an orchid, made by Philippe Wolfers, Belgium, 1905-7. Museum no. M.11-1962 Ornamento de cabelo Belga de 1909.

Museu da Moda, Jóias e Acessórios em Londres.

V&A logo O V&A Victoria and Albert Museums são um grupo de museus South Kensington, o da Infância (Childhood) e o de Coleções de Teatro Online. Trazemos nossa viagem para o de South Kensington que reúne mais de 3000 anos em artefatos, destacando-se moda acessórios e jóias.

Platform shoes, Vivienne Westwood, autumn 1993-4. Museum no. T.225:1,2-1992

Fashion, Jewellery & Accessories

The Victoria and Albert Museum has collected
dress since its earliest days.

The collection covers fashionable dress
from the 17th century to the present day,
with the emphasis on progressive and
influential designs from the major fashion
centres of Europe. The V&A collections
also include accessories such as jewellery,
gloves and handbags.

The Fashion Gallery (Room 40) will be closed
from mid November 2010 to Spring 2012

Check gallery closures list

Grace Kelly: Style Icon

Grace Kelly: Style Icon

This exhibition shows the spectacular wardrobe of Grace Kelly, one of the most popular actresses of the 1950s. Featuring dresses from many of her films as well as the gown she wore to accept her Oscar in 1955. The display will examine Grace Kelly’s glamorous Hollywood image, the evolution of her style as Princess Grace of Monaco, and her enduring appeal as a fashion icon.

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Wedding Fashion

Wedding Fashion

In advance of an exhibition of Wedding Dresses in 2013 we are creating a database of photographs of clothes worn for weddings from all cultures between 1840 and the present. We include civil partnerships. This database will provide a rich record and help people date their own photographs.

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Link to Jewellery

Jewellery

The William and Judith Bollinger Jewellery Gallery displays 3,500 jewels from the V&A’s jewellery collection, one of the finest and most comprehensive in the world. On display are some of the finest designs from the great jewellery houses of the 20th century and jewels designed by important contemporary makers.

'Thistles' corsage ornament, designed by René Lalique, Paris, about 1905. Museum no. Loan:Met Anon.10:1-2007

‘Thistles’ corsage ornament, designed by René Lalique, Paris, about 1905. Museum no. Loan:Met Anon.10:1-2007 (click image for larger version)

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Ethical Fashion/Conscious Style

Ethical Fashion/Conscious Style

Ethical Fashion is an umbrella term to describe ethical fashion design, production, retail, and purchasing. It covers a range of issues such as working conditions, exploitation, fair trade, sustainable production, the environment, and animal welfare.

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A coleção de jóias é imensa a atravessa épocas:

  • Contemporary Jewellery

    Contemporary Jewellery

    Since the 1960s the boundaries of jewellery have been continually redefined. Conventions have been challenged by successive generations of independent jewellers, often educated at art college and immersed in radical ideas.

    More on Contemporary Jewellery

  • Art Deco jewellery to the 1950s

    Art Deco to the 1950s

    Although buffeted by cycles of boom, depression and war, jewellery design between the 1920s and 1950s maintained both innovation and glamour. Dense concentrations of gemstones are characteristic of Art Deco jewellery. From about 1933 gold returned to fashion, partly because it was cheaper than platinum.

    More on Art Deco jewellery to the 1950s

  • Art Nouveau jewellery and the Garland Style 1895–1910

    Art Nouveau and the Garland Style 1895-1910

    The Art Nouveau style caused a dramatic shift in jewellery design, reaching a peak around 1900 when it triumphed at the Paris International Exhibition. Its followers created sinuous, organic pieces whose undercurrents of eroticism and death were a world away from the floral motifs of earlier generations.

    More on Art Nouveau jewellery and the Garland Style 1895–1910

  • Arts & Crafts jewellery

    Link to Arts & Crafts

    Developing in the last years of the 19th century, the Arts and Crafts movement was based on a profound unease with the industrialised world. Its jewellers rejected the machine-led factory system – by now the source of most affordable pieces – and instead focused on hand-crafting individual jewels.

    More on Arts & Crafts jewellery

  • 19th-century jewellery

    The 19th Century

    The 19th century was a period of huge industrial and social change, but in jewellery design the focus was often on the past, evoking the glories of ancient Greece and Rome as well as Medieval and Renaissance styles.

    More on 19th-century jewellery

  • 18th-century jewellery

    The 18th Century

    Diamonds sparkled as never before and came to dominate jewellery design. Frequently mounted in silver to enhance the stone’s white colour, magnificent sets of diamond jewels were essential for court life. The largest were worn on the bodice, while smaller ornaments could be scattered over an outfit.

    More on 18th-century jewellery

  • 17th-century jewellery

    The 17th Century

    By the mid-17th century, changes in fashion had introduced new styles of jewellery. While dark fabrics required elaborate gold jewellery, the new softer pastel shades became graceful backdrops for gemstones and pearls.

    More on 17th-century jewellery

  • Renaissance jewellery

    Renaissance jewellery

    Renaissance jewels shared the age’s passion for splendour. Enamels, often covering both sides of the jewel, became more elaborate and colourful. Advances in cutting techniques increased the glitter of stones.

    More on Renaissance jewellery

  • Medieval Jewellery 1200–1500

    Link to medieval jewellery

    The jewellery worn in medieval Europe reflected an intensely hierarchical and status-conscious society. Royalty and the nobility wore gold, silver and precious gems. Humbler ranks wore base metals, such as copper or pewter.

    More on Medieval Jewellery 1200–1500

  • Ancient World jewellery

    Link to Ancient World

    Jewellery made from shells, stone and bones survives from prehistoric times. In the ancient world the discovery of how to work metals was an important stage in the development of the art of jewellery. Over time, metalworking techniques became more sophisticated and decoration more intricate.

    More on Ancient World jewellery:

Collar known as The Shannongrove Gorget, maker unknown, late Bronze Age (probably 800-700 BC). Museum no. M.35-1948 Collar known as The Shannongrove Gorget, maker unknown, late Bronze Age (probably 800-700 BC). Museum no. M.35-1948 (click image for larger version)

Jewellery is a universal form of adornment. Jewellery made from shells, stone and bones survives from prehistoric times. It is likely that from an early date it was worn as a protection from the dangers of life or as a mark of status or rank.

In the ancient world the discovery of how to work metals was an important stage in the development of the art of jewellery. Over time, metalworking techniques became more sophisticated and decoration more intricate.

Gold, a rare and highly valued material, was buried with the dead so as to accompany its owner into the afterlife. Much archaeological jewellery comes from tombs and hoards. Sometimes, as with the gold collars from Celtic Ireland which have been found folded in half, it appears people may have followed a ritual for the disposal of jewellery.

Click on the images below and to the right for a larger version and more information.

fonte: http://www.vam.ac.uk

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Esse post foi publicado em Arte Comunicação&Design, Design, Geologia Mineralogia Jóias & Metais Preciosos, Museus da Inglaterra e marcado , , , , , , , , , . Guardar link permanente.

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